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Jack Peter
Aug 03, 2022
In Welcome to the Forum
Note that in the paragraph above, I decided to include a warning for errors in what I was trying to present. I see an open place where a person might take what I say the wrong way, most likely because I'm not explaining my point correctly. Every writer, teacher, and communicator has these inadequacies, and it's just a matter of compensating for them, and I try to do that by watering down my true intentions. This is another example of scaffolding and building understanding. In this case, I understand by telling you what I didn't say (or at least try to construct), which sounds interesting and helps you understand what I'm really saying. Proper pacing - the key to creating successful content In a sense, pacing is part of the scaffolding, and in a sense it isn't. Obviously, if you move too fast through ideas or topics, you can't effectively build understanding in a methodical way, which means you can't support your content. Therefore, the two concepts are complementary and in some way mutually exclusive. In either case, proper pacing is critical. The "pace" of a piece of content is much more active than you might think. Of course, pace does refer to an idea of ​​how fast (or hard) you work. You don't have to be an Einstein to know that if you spend a sentence or two thinking about Latest Mailing Database a complex idea, then use another complex idea to come up with another complex idea, and finish it in a sentence or two, you'll lose yours reader. (Though, I would probably say that you do need to be an Einstein because that does happen quite often.) Then we get to other less obvious aspects of pacing. Content Blocking : One of the more common are residential teachers, especially English teachers, who provide content blocks for their special needs students. For example, instead of having students read two paragraphs and then ask a question, read one paragraph and then ask a question. It's an amazing tool that should be used more often than the education world (this is a former teacher and father of a child with "special needs"). Just as "content blocks" should be more prevalent in the classroom, it should be more prevalent in our content (at least according to what I've seen in the content marketing space). Talk more about breaking down the content while keeping your audience interested. However, it is also an important part of architectural understanding. If the idea is complex, break it down into smaller pieces so that you can foster proper content focus and avoid overwhelming the reader. Content Kind : This builds on previous views. The truth is, people need brain breaks, and properly "chunking" your content is just one way. We usually take a "brain break" to take a quick break from whatever we're doing. You know, maybe you'll get out of your chair and get a totally unnecessary sixth cup of coffee (why at the sixth if the first five didn't work?). Providing readers with a variety of content is a necessary part of getting them to learn. Educating people is not just the process of passing on information. In fact, according to some schools of thought, teaching is more about creating conditions for learning than actual delivery of content. On a scale like this, anything from headlines to images can be powerful because they help you size your content appropriately. You can better educate your audience if you view these elements outside of organizational or presentation purposes, and use them to create an appropriate cadence of content. Take a second to think. Do poorly placed images help boost concentration? Titles sometimes help to ease this resistance? That feeling of resistance comes from having to trudge through something that's either a little long or can't be absorbed by consumption without a little effort. Content elements like these help create the proper pace needed to accumulate knowledge. Content Marketing Tip #4 From a purely "knowledge" perspective, the last paragraph is completely unnecessary. If asked, you can paraphrase what I said without it. So why add it? For no better educator than experience. No, the last paragraph doesn't tell you anything new. No, it does more than that, it connects you to the concept. The last paragraph gives you my readers a way to really connect with what I mean by going beyond simple intellectual cognition. This is an invaluable tool when your readers are completely unfamiliar with the concepts you're discussing. If you can find a way to connect the foundation of your content to the experience your readers are likely to have, you have a 90% experience rate here. Connecting personal experiences can be the most effective way to structure your content.
The Forgotten Truth About Content Marketing (Part 2) content media
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Jack Peter

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